The evolution of the College Board from non-profit to corporation

October 25, 2021

AP Students and teachers alike are beginning to experience increased pressures from the College Board as new fee implementations and deadlines amplify the structural disadvantages and economic barriers that make the College Board a very profitable non-profit organization. 

The College Board is one of the most prominent education administrations for high school students around the world making them a universal organization that strives to connect students to higher education. As the years go by and the College Board continues to elevate its practices by implementing late registration fees and sooner registration deadlines, that exhibit characteristics of a corporation concerned more about profit rather than creating a level playing field for all students.

“One of the major barriers that I’m seeing this year is with my English language learners where their English is good but not the same level of the AP test and there are zero modifications and accommodations for them,” AP science teacher Mrs. Taylor explains. Mrs. Taylor highlights some of the inherent structural disadvantages that students of lower socioeconomic status as well as some of the international non-native English speakers face when trying to take advantage of the college-level courses. 

“It really comes down to those who can afford it and feel comfortable about possibly not passing the test and not worry about losing that money vs. those whose families are really struggling that want to take the test but can’t take the risk of not passing and losing that money,” AP teacher, Mrs. Taylor describes about the $100 exam fee. 

“There’s this mentality that you have to take 10 AP courses per year and those kids who have that mentality, their mental health has got to suffer, the workload is crazy and they all almost compete with each for the top ten; which is sad in my opinion,” AP computer science teacher Mrs. Leaming says. While there are benefits to taking these rigorous courses as they develop good study habits and problem solving skills, they also force students to carry heavy work loads and juggle their own unique external and extracurricular issues to varying degrees. 

“It really comes down to those who can afford it and feel comfortable about possibly not passing the test and not worry about losing that money vs. those whose families are really struggling that want to take the test but can’t take the risk of not passing and losing that money””

— Mrs. Taylor

SDHS math teacher and former AP student says, “ I would say AP courses are a good experience but instead of just thinking about the test take classes that you are interested in, a lot of students might take classes for college credit but don’t do that to yourself if that is not what your interested in you also have to think about maintaining your social life seeing whether your active lifestyle meshes with the lifestyle of an AP student.” Each student’s individual experience is so unique and choosing courses personalized to your specific interests can make the AP experience much more enriching and valuable as students enter into college with previous exposure to advanced courses and workloads with adapted study techniques and determined mindsets.

Saint Scroll • Copyright 2022 • FLEX WordPress Theme by SNOLog in